Wissenschaft und Deutsch

medievalpoc:

Medievalpoc Presents: History of POC in Math and Science Week, 8-3-14 through 8-9-14!

Medievalpoc’s first Patreon Milestone Goal has been reached, and the History of POC in Math and Science Week is happening soon! This all-new themed week will focus on the contribution of people of color to the fields of mathematics, science, physics, medicine, natural philosophy, and much, much more!

There will be a focus on primary documents with interactive elements, visual and documentary evidence, innovators and their biographies, and notable personages of color from the Islamic Golden Age, Medieval Europe, African Empires and Universities, Asian images and texts, and discussion about early modern globalization regarding how this knowledge traveled.

If you have an article, image, document, or commentary you would like to submit, here’s your chance to weigh in on this topic! Please use the “Math and Science Week” and any other relevant tags for your submission, and I look forward to hearing about your favorite mathematicians and scientists of color!

greenpeaceaustp:

100 million sharks are killed each year by overfishing. Adorable video by @lwbean http://t.co/1B8IAuHI29 #savesharks

greenpeaceaustp:

100 million sharks are killed each year by overfishing. Adorable video by @lwbean http://t.co/1B8IAuHI29 #savesharks

sixpenceee:

Schizophrenia: patients usually have less brain tissue
Major Depression: scans show less brain activity in depressed brain
Alzheimer’s: brain tissue significantly shrinks, hippocampus is usually the first region to go
ADHD: less brain activity in the frontal cortex (area associated with decision making) 
OCD: high brain activity 
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): hippocampal volume reduction (area involved in memory) and increased activation of the amygdala (area involved in emotional responses) 

sixpenceee:

  • Schizophrenia: patients usually have less brain tissue
  • Major Depression: scans show less brain activity in depressed brain
  • Alzheimer’s: brain tissue significantly shrinks, hippocampus is usually the first region to go
  • ADHD: less brain activity in the frontal cortex (area associated with decision making) 
  • OCD: high brain activity 
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): hippocampal volume reduction (area involved in memory) and increased activation of the amygdala (area involved in emotional responses) 
Reblogged from SoSanguineRN

Long story short, century eggs are preserved eggs. They are also referred to as thousand-year eggs or millennium eggs, but are not preserved for a millennium, one thousand years, or even a century. The process actually takes anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, and involves soaking eggs in a saline solution. Duck, quail or chicken eggs can be used. The solution usually consists of clay and salt, but can also include ash, quicklime and rice hulls. It causes the yolk of the eggs to take on a creamy, cheese-like texture, and transforms the whites into a dark-colored jelly.

They can be eaten alone, but are often served with pickled ginger root. They can also accompany congee, or rice porridge.

Etymology
Century eggs have many names, including the aforementioned few. In China, they are sometimes referred to as “pine-patterned eggs.” This is due to the intricate, woodland-looking patterns that show up near the eggs’ surface.

The Thai name, khai yiao ma, translates as “horse urine eggs.” This is rooted in the misconception that the eggs are made by soaking in horse urine — a belief that is held due to their pungent odor.

History
According to legend, these eggs have existed for centuries, with their accidental discovery dating back to the Ming Dynasty in China. A resident of the Hunan province supposedly discovered duck eggs left in a pool or slaked lime and decided to try them.

from HuffPost 

Fact of the Day:The giant squid, or Architeuthis dux as it’s scientifically known, has a complex yet small donut-shaped brain. The squid’s oesophagus runs through the ‘donut-hole’ of the brain making it essential for food to be ground into small pieces by it’s notorious beak.Read more about this fascinating creature herewww.ocean.si.edu/giant-squid (Graphic via funnyjunk.com)
source 

Fact of the Day:
The giant squid, or Architeuthis dux as it’s scientifically known, has a complex yet small donut-shaped brain. The squid’s oesophagus runs through the ‘donut-hole’ of the brain making it essential for food to be ground into small pieces by it’s notorious beak.
Read more about this fascinating creature herewww.ocean.si.edu/giant-squid 
(Graphic via funnyjunk.com)

source 

(fun fact: I have the first and third photographs on my door :) )

Q&A: Scientist Studied His Poop for a Year to Learn About Gut Bugs

Gut microbes may be key to human health, but tracking them proves a tough task.

Karen Weintraub

for National Geographic

PUBLISHED JULY 24, 2014

Where would we be without our gut bugs? These bacteria help us do everything from digesting food to recovering from disease, but scientists are still learning exactly what gut bugs do, and even how to study them.

In the latest report from this inner frontier of science,Lawrence David, formerly a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his adviser, Eric Alm, tracked their own bodily functions—which largely meant studying their poop and pee—to see what might alter the colonies of bacteria that live in their guts. (Related: "Why Has This Really Common Virus Only Just Been Discovered?")

They used cutting-edge DNA analysis and also perhaps the oldest health metric ever used by humans, studying their own feces. The results of their 2009-2010 adventure are published Thursday in the journal Genome Biology.

National Geographic talked to David, now an assistant professor at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, about the experience and what he learned.

For the most part, were gut bugs pretty stable across time?

The most abundant species you would see for days, weeks, months. We couldn’t find very many lifestyle variables that would cause a new species to show up or disappear.

You write in the study that the biggest change you saw was from an accidental food poisoning.

In about a week, about half the [bacterial] species that had been very abundant became much, much, much less abundant. Many of them dropped to at or below our detection limit.

You also saw some quick changes in gut bugs from eating fiber. Were you intentionally eating fiber to see what would happen?

The subjects were instructed not to alter their diets. The power of our study was that we weren’t telling people, “You have to eat fiber bars for this one week and then we’re going to analyze it.” We said, “Just live your life the way you normally would and we’ll see what we can learn.”

Wait a minute. You refer to the people in your study as “the subjects,” but weren’t they really you and your adviser, Eric Alm?

As scientists, we were trying to be as impartial as possible in how we analyze our data and interpret it. In many ways it was a pilot study. We were trying to figure out what kind of host actions could be tracked and what was feasible to look at in people over time. In a pilot study, we didn’t want people doing things that we ourselves wouldn’t really be comfortable doing.

Are there metrics that will be too difficult to ask future subjects?

Now I know that tracking things like urination [is too onerous]. Compliance would probably be abysmal.

read more from NatGeo

After quitting all meds

I feel like a potato. It’s hard for me to do ANYTHING without getting light headed and exhausted. Even with 8 cups of coffee under my belt all I want to do is lay down and sleep ( this coming from someone who was also diagnosed with insomnia). I don’t trust my doctors and I’m sick of meds…

oh and hallucinations galore
pubhealth:

This graphic shows the life cycle of the ebolavirus. Bats are strongly implicated as both reservoirs and hosts for the ebolavirus. Of the five identified ebolavirus subtypes, four are capable of human-to-human transmission. Initial infections in humans result from contact with an infected bat or other wild animal. Strict isolation of infected patients is essential to reduce onward ebolavirus transmission.
(From CDC)

pubhealth:

This graphic shows the life cycle of the ebolavirus. Bats are strongly implicated as both reservoirs and hosts for the ebolavirus. Of the five identified ebolavirus subtypes, four are capable of human-to-human transmission. Initial infections in humans result from contact with an infected bat or other wild animal. Strict isolation of infected patients is essential to reduce onward ebolavirus transmission.

(From CDC)

Reblogged from Public Health
Keeping Viral Load Low
By Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR, USCD
Over the past 30 years, the combined efforts of scientists and clinicians have delivered remarkable successes in HIV therapeutics. Since 1987, the FDA has approved more than 30 antiviral drugs, including 12 HIV protease inhibitors and one integrase inhibitor. These drugs stop ~99% of viral replication, essentially transforming HIV infection from a deadly disease to a chronic one. What will the next 30 years bring?
Image: Here numerous HIV-1 particles leave a cultured HeLa cell. These viruses lack their vpu gene and thus can’t detach from the cell’s tethering factor, BST2. Each viron particle is ~120nm in diameter. The image was captured with a Zeiss Merlin ultra high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The cells were fixed, dehydrated, critical-point dried, and lightly sputter-coated with gold/palladium.
through Cell.com

Keeping Viral Load Low

By Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR, USCD

Over the past 30 years, the combined efforts of scientists and clinicians have delivered remarkable successes in HIV therapeutics. Since 1987, the FDA has approved more than 30 antiviral drugs, including 12 HIV protease inhibitors and one integrase inhibitor. These drugs stop ~99% of viral replication, essentially transforming HIV infection from a deadly disease to a chronic one. What will the next 30 years bring?

Image: Here numerous HIV-1 particles leave a cultured HeLa cell. These viruses lack their vpu gene and thus can’t detach from the cell’s tethering factor, BST2. Each viron particle is ~120nm in diameter. The image was captured with a Zeiss Merlin ultra high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The cells were fixed, dehydrated, critical-point dried, and lightly sputter-coated with gold/palladium.

through Cell.com

intrauterine:

"Depression is such a cruel punishment. There are no fevers, no rashes, no blood tests to send people scurrying in concern. Just the slow erosion of the self, as insidious as any cancer. And, like cancer, it is essentially a solitary experience. A room in hell with only your name on the door."