Wissenschaft und Deutsch
Reblogged from Küste zu Küste
eviscerator:

This device uses infrared technology to help find veins
How? Well it works in a similar way to pulse oximetry. Haemoglobin in the blood absorbs infrared light. When AccuVein’s device is held above the skin, it can detect the difference in the haemoglobin concentration between the veins and surrounding tissue, projecting a map of the veins on the skin above them. Locating the point of needle placement is suddenly simplified for phlebotomy techniques.
This technique has been used for some time when drawing blood from newborns, but is now becoming more frequently used in adults. Those with particularly difficult venous access (DVA) can include:
The elderly;
Dark-skinned patients, whose veins may not be visible;
Obese patients, whose veins may not be visible or palpable;
Patients having many diagnostic or therapeutic intravenous procedures;
Burn victims;
Agitated or restless patients;
Oncology patients on chemotherapy;
Other patients with chronic diseases;
Drug abusers.

eviscerator:

This device uses infrared technology to help find veins

How? Well it works in a similar way to pulse oximetry. Haemoglobin in the blood absorbs infrared light. When AccuVein’s device is held above the skin, it can detect the difference in the haemoglobin concentration between the veins and surrounding tissue, projecting a map of the veins on the skin above them. Locating the point of needle placement is suddenly simplified for phlebotomy techniques.

This technique has been used for some time when drawing blood from newborns, but is now becoming more frequently used in adults. Those with particularly difficult venous access (DVA) can include:

  • The elderly;
  • Dark-skinned patients, whose veins may not be visible;
  • Obese patients, whose veins may not be visible or palpable;
  • Patients having many diagnostic or therapeutic intravenous procedures;
  • Burn victims;
  • Agitated or restless patients;
  • Oncology patients on chemotherapy;
  • Other patients with chronic diseases;
  • Drug abusers.
Reblogged from SoSanguineRN
This is where the sperms get produced: Cross section of a human testis tubule filled with sperm. Scanning electron micrograph, magnification x363.By Richard Kessel
from Daily Anatomy

This is where the sperms get produced: Cross section of a human testis tubule filled with sperm. 

Scanning electron micrograph, magnification x363.
By Richard Kessel

from Daily Anatomy

sciencealert:

The Pacific island of Palau is establishing a no-fishing zone that will cover 630,000 square kilometres to let the populations ‘heal’ after years of relentless commercial fishing.
Read more: http://bit.ly/WDQK70
Image: Ethan Daniels/Shutterstock

sciencealert:

The Pacific island of Palau is establishing a no-fishing zone that will cover 630,000 square kilometres to let the populations ‘heal’ after years of relentless commercial fishing.

Read more: http://bit.ly/WDQK70

Image: Ethan Daniels/Shutterstock

Reblogged from ScienceAlert
An illegal trader was arrested Tuesday in Cameroon in possession of 4 gorilla heads and 16 hands and legs, following a joint operation between Cameroon law enforcement officials and the Last Great Ape Organization (LAGA). This brings to 34 the number of great apes lost to traders in ape parts in Cameroon in 2014. For more information, visithttps://www.facebook.com/ofir.drori?fref=photo.
from Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)

An illegal trader was arrested Tuesday in Cameroon in possession of 4 gorilla heads and 16 hands and legs, following a joint operation between Cameroon law enforcement officials and the Last Great Ape Organization (LAGA). This brings to 34 the number of great apes lost to traders in ape parts in Cameroon in 2014. For more information, visithttps://www.facebook.com/ofir.drori?fref=photo.

from Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)

A red-necked wallaby drops by to visit a PN member in our Rangers’ spotting of the week! Kdpicturemaker has monitored this grizzled old male since he first appeared emaciated and covered in ticks. Luckily he has made a full recovery and now brings his lady friend and their new joey along too!http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/688596002









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A red-necked wallaby drops by to visit a PN member in our Rangers’ spotting of the week! Kdpicturemaker has monitored this grizzled old male since he first appeared emaciated and covered in ticks. Luckily he has made a full recovery and now brings his lady friend and their new joey along too!

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/688596002
greenpeaceaustp:

Coal plants consume as much water as the basic needs of 5 billion people http://t.co/m9cil7Ux7i #NoWater4Coal #wwweek http://t.co/cW3HWMeZzQ

greenpeaceaustp:

Coal plants consume as much water as the basic needs of 5 billion people http://t.co/m9cil7Ux7i #NoWater4Coal #wwweek http://t.co/cW3HWMeZzQ

biodiverseed:

eat-to-thrive:

Chioggia beets! These are my favourite variety of beet to grow. They taste very similar to regular red beets, in my opinion. Also really easy to grow where I live. This beauty is going in my salad tonight! 🌿  (at Sunshine Coast, BC)

#beets #heirloom seeds #Canada

biodiverseed:

eat-to-thrive:

Chioggia beets! These are my favourite variety of beet to grow. They taste very similar to regular red beets, in my opinion. Also really easy to grow where I live. This beauty is going in my salad tonight! 🌿  (at Sunshine Coast, BC)

#beets #heirloom seeds #Canada

distant-traveller:

Cosmic caterpillar

This light-year-long knot of interstellar gas and dust resembles a caterpillar on its way to a feast. But the meat of the story is not only what this cosmic caterpillar eats for lunch, but also what’s eating it. Harsh winds from extremely bright stars located 15 light-years away from the knot towards the right edge of the image, are blasting ultraviolet radiation at this “wanna-be” star and sculpting the gas and dust into its long shape.
The caterpillar-shaped knot, called IRAS 20324+4057, is a protostar in a very early evolutionary stage. It is still in the process of collecting material from an envelope of gas surrounding it.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), and IPHAS

distant-traveller:

Cosmic caterpillar

This light-year-long knot of interstellar gas and dust resembles a caterpillar on its way to a feast. But the meat of the story is not only what this cosmic caterpillar eats for lunch, but also what’s eating it. Harsh winds from extremely bright stars located 15 light-years away from the knot towards the right edge of the image, are blasting ultraviolet radiation at this “wanna-be” star and sculpting the gas and dust into its long shape.

The caterpillar-shaped knot, called IRAS 20324+4057, is a protostar in a very early evolutionary stage. It is still in the process of collecting material from an envelope of gas surrounding it.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), and IPHAS

Reblogged from Mind Blowing Science!