Wissenschaft und Deutsch (on Hiatus)

Depression is so komisch

kuestezukueste:

My life isn’t too bad right now but I can’t stop crying because I feel alone and unloved. Like these feelings just flood in from God knows where and drag me back down

Reblogged from Küste zu Küste

tastefullyoffensive:

Better School Mascots [beatricethebiologist]

Reblogged from Super Nerdy Stoner

On the 4th of April last year, Lewa lost one of its greatest icons, co-founder Anna Merz. Anna’s courage and tenacity led her to venture into rhino conservation when few would, pioneering the Ngare Sergoi Rhino Sanctuary along with the Craig family in the early 1980s. The Ngare Sergoi was later reinvented as the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy. 

The success of Lewa is a true testament that Anna’s vision and dedication created a greater impact than she had ever hoped for. 

Lewa’s mama vifaru – Swahili for mother of rhinos as she is fondly remembered – leaves behind a lasting legacy of a conservationist whose love and passion for wildlife has inspired people around the world. She is a champion who found her cause and did all she could to protect the animals she so dearly loved. 

Lewa’s history will forever be intertwined with Anna’s; so will the future of black rhinos in Kenya that she dedicated her life to protect.

text and photo source

Want to build your own space agency? Well, now you can, because NASA’s about to give away a whole bunch of their code for free! You’ll have access to the coding behind robots, cryogenic systems and climate simulators. There’s even code for running rocket guidance systems.Read more: http://wrd.cm/1i5Q3H9 via WiredImage: NASA
source

Want to build your own space agency? Well, now you can, because NASA’s about to give away a whole bunch of their code for free! You’ll have access to the coding behind robots, cryogenic systems and climate simulators. There’s even code for running rocket guidance systems.

Read more: http://wrd.cm/1i5Q3H9 via Wired

Image: NASA

source

TODAY is amazingly beautiful

I am so happy, things are going so well!!

Tags: finally

Help COPD patients share inspiring stories

Hi,

Healthline just launched a campaign for called “You Are Not Your COPD” where COPD patients share their story or advice about living with the disease. You can see the homepage for the campaign here: http://www.healthline.com/health/copd/inspirational-stories

We have partnered with the COPD Foundation to promote the campaign and have pledged that for every submitted story, Healthline will donate $10 to the COPD Foundation.

The more stories we receive the more Healthline will donate to COPD research, support, and treatment programs. 

I’m happy to answer any questions you may have.

Thank you,
Maggie Danhakl • Assistant Marketing Manager
p: 415-281-3124 f: 415-281-3199

Healthline • The Power of Intelligent Health
660 Third Street, San Francisco, CA 94107 
www.healthline.com | @Healthline | @HealthlineCorp

About Us: corp.healthline.com

The above information is from the lovely Maggie Danhaki, if you have COPD or know someone who does and you or that person would like to share your story, definitely check out the above link (bolded) and please feel free to reblog!

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu CraterHalema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fbSee more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater athttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb
text and photo from NASA 

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

Halema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.

See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/

See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at 
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fb

See more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb

text and photo from NASA 

lifeunderthewaves:

Ohhh…Octopus by Tropigal1027 This octopus’ longest extended tentacle was 18 feet long. Glad he was behind the glass. Taken in Morro Bay, California.

lifeunderthewaves:

Ohhh…Octopus by Tropigal1027 This octopus’ longest extended tentacle was 18 feet long. Glad he was behind the glass. Taken in Morro Bay, California.

Reblogged from LIFE UNDER THE WAVES




An artificial heart valve is a device implanted in the heart of a patient with valvular heart disease. When one of the four heart valves malfunctions, the medical choice may be to replace the natural valve with an artificial valve. This requires open-heart surgery.Valves are integral to the normal physiological functioning of the human heart. Natural heart valves are evolved to forms that perform the functional requirement of inducing unidirectional blood flow through the valve structure from one chamber of the heart to another. Natural heart valves become dysfunctional for a variety of pathological causes. Some pathologies may require complete surgical replacement of the natural heart valve with a heart valve prosthesis.Mechanical heart valves are prosthetics designed to replicate the function of the natural valves of the human heart. The human heart contains four valves: tricuspid valve, pulmonic valve, mitral valve and aortic valve. Their main purpose is to maintain unimpeded forward flow through the heart and from the heart into the major blood vessels connected to the heart, the pulmonary artery and the aorta. As a result of a number of disease processes, both acquired and congenital, any one of the four heart valves may malfunction and result in either stenosis (impeded forward flow) and/or backward flow (regurgitation). Either process burdens the heart and may lead to serious problems including heart failure. A mechanical heart valve is intended to replace a diseased heart valve with its prosthetic equivalent.There are two basic types of valves that can be used for valve replacement, mechanical and tissue valves. Modern mechanical valves can last indefinitely (the equivalent of over 50,000 years in an accelerated valve wear tester). However, current mechanical heart valves all require lifelong treatment with anticoagulants (blood thinners).Biological valves are valves of animals, like pigs, which undergo several chemical procedures in order to make them suitable for implantation in the human heart. The porcine (or pig) heart is most similar to the human heart, and therefore represents the best anatomical fit for replacement. Implantation of a porcine valve is a type of xenotransplantation, also known as a xenograft, which means a transplant from one species (in this case a pig) to another. There are some risks associated with a xenograft such as the human body’s tendency to reject foreign material. Medication can be used to retard this effect, but is not always successful.Image found on http://www.heartsurgeon.co.in/

text source
An artificial heart valve is a device implanted in the heart of a patient with valvular heart disease. When one of the four heart valves malfunctions, the medical choice may be to replace the natural valve with an artificial valve. This requires open-heart surgery.

Valves are integral to the normal physiological functioning of the human heart. Natural heart valves are evolved to forms that perform the functional requirement of inducing unidirectional blood flow through the valve structure from one chamber of the heart to another. 

Natural heart valves become dysfunctional for a variety of pathological causes. Some pathologies may require complete surgical replacement of the natural heart valve with a heart valve prosthesis.

Mechanical heart valves are prosthetics designed to replicate the function of the natural valves of the human heart. The human heart contains four valves: tricuspid valve, pulmonic valve, mitral valve and aortic valve. Their main purpose is to maintain unimpeded forward flow through the heart and from the heart into the major blood vessels connected to the heart, the pulmonary artery and the aorta. 

As a result of a number of disease processes, both acquired and congenital, any one of the four heart valves may malfunction and result in either stenosis (impeded forward flow) and/or backward flow (regurgitation). Either process burdens the heart and may lead to serious problems including heart failure. A mechanical heart valve is intended to replace a diseased heart valve with its prosthetic equivalent.

There are two basic types of valves that can be used for valve replacement, mechanical and tissue valves. Modern mechanical valves can last indefinitely (the equivalent of over 50,000 years in an accelerated valve wear tester). However, current mechanical heart valves all require lifelong treatment with anticoagulants (blood thinners).

Biological valves are valves of animals, like pigs, which undergo several chemical procedures in order to make them suitable for implantation in the human heart. The porcine (or pig) heart is most similar to the human heart, and therefore represents the best anatomical fit for replacement. Implantation of a porcine valve is a type of xenotransplantation, also known as a xenograft, which means a transplant from one species (in this case a pig) to another. 

There are some risks associated with a xenograft such as the human body’s tendency to reject foreign material. Medication can be used to retard this effect, but is not always successful.

Image found on http://www.heartsurgeon.co.in/
text source