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These beautiful stones were accidentally created from layers of car paint In old auto factories At first glance, these brilliantly colorful gemstones might look like agate, a stone valued for its beauty and used in the jewelry industry. Their origin, however, might surprise you – these stones, called Fordite or Detroit Agate, are actually paint deposits from old car paintings racks.Before the car painting process was automated like it is now, automotive bodies were painted by hand on long production lines. The vehicles’ paint would drip off and dry on the equipment used to move the automotive bodies. This enamel paint would then get baked onto the rack and solidify. After this process is repeated hundreds or thousands of times, the deposits can grow to be several inches thick.Enterprising workers who recognized their potential value chipped off these waste products and saved them to be turned into jewelry later. When these stones are ground down and polished, they reveal a dazzling array of colors.Article by Boredpanda.com
through Neurons want food

These beautiful stones were accidentally created from layers of car paint In old auto factories 

At first glance, these brilliantly colorful gemstones might look like agate, a stone valued for its beauty and used in the jewelry industry. Their origin, however, might surprise you – these stones, called Fordite or Detroit Agate, are actually paint deposits from old car paintings racks.

Before the car painting process was automated like it is now, automotive bodies were painted by hand on long production lines. The vehicles’ paint would drip off and dry on the equipment used to move the automotive bodies. This enamel paint would then get baked onto the rack and solidify. After this process is repeated hundreds or thousands of times, the deposits can grow to be several inches thick.

Enterprising workers who recognized their potential value chipped off these waste products and saved them to be turned into jewelry later. When these stones are ground down and polished, they reveal a dazzling array of colors.

Article by Boredpanda.com

through Neurons want food

Florida to Louisiana Viewed From the International Space Station: NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this image of Florida to Louisiana just before dawn, taken from the space station, and posted it to social media on Friday, Sept. 12. Wiseman, Commander Max Suraev and Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst began their first full workweek Monday as a three-person crew aboard the station, while the three additional flight engineers who will round out the Expedition 41 crew spent the day training for next week’s launch to the orbiting complex.Image Credit: NASA
through NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration facebook page

Florida to Louisiana Viewed From the International Space Station: NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this image of Florida to Louisiana just before dawn, taken from the space station, and posted it to social media on Friday, Sept. 12. Wiseman, Commander Max Suraev and Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst began their first full workweek Monday as a three-person crew aboard the station, while the three additional flight engineers who will round out the Expedition 41 crew spent the day training for next week’s launch to the orbiting complex.

Image Credit: NASA

through NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration facebook page

Tags: NASA space cool
Violinist plays Mozart during brain surgery to conquer 20-year hand tremor (VIDEO)
A violinist played Mozart during her brain surgery in an Israeli clinic to help neurosurgeons correct her hand tremor. For 20 years the tremor halted her career, but after the operation she will be able to play professionally again.
Naomi Elishuv was a professional violinist of the Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra before diagnosed with a hand tremor. She then had to stop her career.
On Tuesday, Elishuv underwent surgery at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center to suppress the symptoms of her disease.
The operation was unique: Professor Yitzhak Fried, Director of Functional Neurosurgery, who operated on Naomi, said that this was the first time he "operated on a patient who played an instrument during surgery. I am so pleased that we had the opportunity to enjoy a private concert from a most talented and honorable musician," he told Israeli media.
Fried explained that during the operation the doctors implanted and positioned a brain pacemaker with electrodes in the area of the brain disturbance. The device emits impulses to suppress the tremor that was disturbing Elishuv’s violin-playing.
read more and watch video from RT!

Violinist plays Mozart during brain surgery to conquer 20-year hand tremor (VIDEO)

A violinist played Mozart during her brain surgery in an Israeli clinic to help neurosurgeons correct her hand tremor. For 20 years the tremor halted her career, but after the operation she will be able to play professionally again.

Naomi Elishuv was a professional violinist of the Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra before diagnosed with a hand tremor. She then had to stop her career.

On Tuesday, Elishuv underwent surgery at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center to suppress the symptoms of her disease.

The operation was unique: Professor Yitzhak Fried, Director of Functional Neurosurgery, who operated on Naomi, said that this was the first time he "operated on a patient who played an instrument during surgery. I am so pleased that we had the opportunity to enjoy a private concert from a most talented and honorable musician," he told Israeli media.

Fried explained that during the operation the doctors implanted and positioned a brain pacemaker with electrodes in the area of the brain disturbance. The device emits impulses to suppress the tremor that was disturbing Elishuv’s violin-playing.

read more and watch video from RT!

Japan may be short on land, but that’s not stopping the country from investing in renewable energy. Two floating solar farms are scheduled to be operational by April 2015, and they’ll eventually become part of a 60 megawatt floating solar network: http://bit.ly/1qWwSUL
source 

Japan may be short on land, but that’s not stopping the country from investing in renewable energy. Two floating solar farms are scheduled to be operational by April 2015, and they’ll eventually become part of a 60 megawatt floating solar network: http://bit.ly/1qWwSUL

source 

This colossal circle in the Sahara Desert is known as the ‘Eye of Africa’. Scientists originally thought a meteorite had created it but now they believe it is simply a geological oddity caused by the erosion of layers of rock: http://1.usa.gov/1lzOREn via NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationImage: Oleg Artemyev/Roscosmos
through ScienceAlert

This colossal circle in the Sahara Desert is known as the ‘Eye of Africa’. Scientists originally thought a meteorite had created it but now they believe it is simply a geological oddity caused by the erosion of layers of rock: http://1.usa.gov/1lzOREn via NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Image: Oleg Artemyev/Roscosmos

through ScienceAlert

Violinist plays during brain surgeryMusician Roger Frisch underwent deep brain stimulation to fix tremors in his hands and played the violin throughout the process.http://bit.ly/1m453IuSource ScienceAlert through Daily Anatomy

Violinist plays during brain surgery
Musician Roger Frisch underwent deep brain stimulation to fix tremors in his hands and played the violin throughout the process.
http://bit.ly/1m453Iu
Source ScienceAlert through Daily Anatomy

Mola Mola: The Weirdest Fish in the Ocean?

By Craig Leisher

When it hatches, a Mola mola is the size of a pinhead but will grow to be the heaviest bony fish in the ocean—and the weirdest.

The weirdness begins with the eggs. A female Mola mola or ocean sunfish produces more eggs than any other vertebrate on earth.

One modest-sized female had an estimate 300 million eggs inside her.

At birth, the baby fish are protected by a star-shaped transparent covering that looks like someone put an alien head inside of a Christmas ornament—albeit a very small only a tenth of an inch across.

Even as a baby, the Mola mola has its parents’ surprised look with the wide eye and open mouth.

The baby will grow fast. Very fast. One individual in the Monterey Bay Aquarium gained 822 pounds in just 15 months (almost 2 pounds a day).

By the time it is an adolescent, the fish will have not tail fin, no ribs, a fused spine, and will swim by flapping its dorsal fin on the top and its anal fin on the bottom.

It will look like a giant swimming head.

Mola molas spend much of their lives in the open ocean chasing the sea jellie (a.k.a. jellyfish) they often eat. They have unusual teeth that are fused together inside a mouth they never close.

They are called the ocean sunfish because they are frequently seen catching rays on the ocean surface. One reason they float on the surface is so birds can peck out the parasites off their skin.

And they have a lot of parasites. More than 50 species of parasites have been recorded on and inside Mola molas.

Like sharks and rays, the female are far bigger than the males. The heaviest Mola mola on record is a female caught in 1996 that weighed 5,071 pounds (2,300 kg).

Here a picture from 1910 of a Mola mola that weighed an estimate 3,500 pounds. (1,600 kg).

The huge decline in shark populations and far greater numbers of sea jellies in the ocean mean Mola molas now have fewer predators and more food. The 21th century looks like a good one if you’re a Mola mola.

But who knows for how long. Given that they are one of the few large fish in the ocean that are doing well, don’t be surprised if someone gives the Mola Mola a catchy new name and starts selling them globally, just as marketers did for the Slimehead (Orange Roughy) and the Patagonia toothfish (Chilean sea bass).

You can see a Mola molas at a Nature Conservancy-supported marine protected area near Bali, Indonesia. The Mola mola congregate near Nusa Penida Island, and during the peak of mola season in October, there is a great chance of seeing the weirdness (and the parasites) of the Mola mola firsthand.

- See more at: http://blog.nature.org/science/2014/04/02/mola-mola-the-weirdest-fish-in-the-ocean/#sthash.J4zj7wCj.dpuf

Hey Followers! I have a new awesome opportunity for you and/or someone you know!! It’s called the AAT project! Read more from their website:

The AAT Project™  is looking for teens with ideas that will change the world and shape the future. If you’re up for the challenge, $75,000 could be yours.

The AAT Project is an online competition that will identify, mentor and manage exceptional teens whose ideas will change the world. Our mission is to promote technological and scientific innovation, and change the cultural aspect of what science and math look like by setting a new higher standard for teen role models. We’re Discovering Brilliance!

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This is an awesome UV-reactive tattoo of the lower arm bones! Black light tattoos use a UV-reactive tattoo ink that can be seen under a black light but are invisible or only partially visible in normal light.
from Daily Anatomy

This is an awesome UV-reactive tattoo of the lower arm bones! 

Black light tattoos use a UV-reactive tattoo ink that can be seen under a black light but are invisible or only partially visible in normal light.

from Daily Anatomy

And it lives in half of the world’s population:http://bit.ly/1lUvvUy

source

And it lives in half of the world’s population:http://bit.ly/1lUvvUy