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Good job, Sydney! The city is now offering recyclers food vouchers, city bus tickets and the chance to win harbour tickets to New Year’s Eve celebrations in exchange for plastic and metal waste:http://bit.ly/1ogExP8Image: Cash for Containers Campaign
source

Good job, Sydney! The city is now offering recyclers food vouchers, city bus tickets and the chance to win harbour tickets to New Year’s Eve celebrations in exchange for plastic and metal waste:http://bit.ly/1ogExP8

Image: Cash for Containers Campaign

source

Tags: Earth smart cool
Read More:L#1: http://is.gd/YMoeJ9L#2: http://is.gd/XrzgovEnlarge this graphic: http://is.gd/QudEJAMore science graphics here: http://is.gd/ytqOG8
from Hashem AL-ghaili

Read More:

L#1: http://is.gd/YMoeJ9
L#2: http://is.gd/Xrzgov

Enlarge this graphic: http://is.gd/QudEJA
More science graphics here: http://is.gd/ytqOG8

from Hashem AL-ghaili

178 barrels of oil spill into Colorado’s only designated wild and scenic river

A 7,500-gallon storage tank of crude oil has completely drained into the scenic Cache La Poudre, Colorado’s only designated National Wild and Scenic River, southeast of Fort Collins.

Vegetation was covered by an oil slick a quarter-mile downstream, but authorities claim “no drinking water intakes have been affected.”

The environmental disaster occurred at Noble Energy facility near Windsor in northern Colorado, in imminent proximity to the popular Poudre River Trail, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) reported late Friday afternoon.

Spring floods caved in the riverbank with a sat storage tank containing 178 barrels (roughly 7,500 gallons or over 28 tons) of crude oil. As a result the tank dropped from its foundation and broke a discharge valve, so all of the oil inside just flowed out right into the river, polluting the water and vegetation several hundred meters downstream.

A statement issued by the Colorado Department of Natural Resources maintained that no drinking water intakes have been affected by the spill, said Todd Hartman, a representative of the Colorado Department of Natural Resources.

“The release is not ongoing,” he said, adding that the well near the tank has been shut in.

A similar tank next to the damaged one remained intact.

The operator of the oil storage facility reported the incident to Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission and State Department of Public Health and Environment.

A combined response team from these organizations and Noble Energy have been deployed to the area.

The clean-up crew deployed skimming absorbent material everywhere oil could be seen and used a vacuum truck to remove oil-contaminated water from the low area around the tank.

source: RT

This is what it looks like to swim between two continental plates. The Silfra fissure in Iceland separates the North American and Eurasian plates, which drift 2 cm away from each other every year, causing earthquakes about once per decade.Read more: http://huff.to/1lsEyN4 via The Huffington PostImage: Alex Mustard
source

This is what it looks like to swim between two continental plates. The Silfra fissure in Iceland separates the North American and Eurasian plates, which drift 2 cm away from each other every year, causing earthquakes about once per decade.

Read more: http://huff.to/1lsEyN4 via The Huffington Post

Image: Alex Mustard

source

Because I’m too depressed to leave my home today, here’s some lovely planet Earth :)
Van Gogh from Space - July 13th, 2005

In the style of Van Gogh’s painting “Starry Night,” massive congregations of greenish phytoplankton swirl in the dark water around Gotland, a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea. Phytoplankton are microscopic marine plants that form the first link in nearly all ocean food chains. Population explosions, or blooms, of phytoplankton, like the one shown here, occur when deep currents bring nutrients up to sunlit surface waters, fueling the growth and reproduction of these tiny plants.

Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7
text source: NASA

Because I’m too depressed to leave my home today, here’s some lovely planet Earth :)

Van Gogh from Space - July 13th, 2005

In the style of Van Gogh’s painting “Starry Night,” massive congregations of greenish phytoplankton swirl in the dark water around Gotland, a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea. Phytoplankton are microscopic marine plants that form the first link in nearly all ocean food chains. Population explosions, or blooms, of phytoplankton, like the one shown here, occur when deep currents bring nutrients up to sunlit surface waters, fueling the growth and reproduction of these tiny plants.

Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7

text source: NASA

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu CraterHalema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fbSee more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater athttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb
photo and text from NASA

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

Halema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.

See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/

See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at 
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fb

See more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb

photo and text from NASA

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu CraterHalema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fbSee more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater athttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb
text and photo from NASA 

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

Halema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.

See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/

See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at 
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fb

See more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb

text and photo from NASA 

Florida LandscapesThe variety of landscapes in southeastern Florida and the northern Everglades illustrates why you might want to see the world in false color. View this region in different false color combinations and read more athttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=83256&src=fb
from NASA

Florida Landscapes

The variety of landscapes in southeastern Florida and the northern Everglades illustrates why you might want to see the world in false color. View this region in different false color combinations and read more athttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=83256&src=fb

from NASA

One of the fascinating aspects of viewing Earth at night is how well the lights show the distribution of people. In this view of Egypt, we see a population almost completely concentrated along the Nile Valley, just a small percentage of the country’s land area.
The Nile River and its delta look like a brilliant, long-stemmed flower in this astronaut photograph of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea, as seen from the International Space Station. The Cairo metropolitan area forms a particularly bright base of the flower. The smaller cities and towns within the Nile Delta tend to be hard to see amidst the dense agricultural vegetation during the day. However, these settled areas and the connecting roads between them become clearly visible at night. Likewise, urbanized regions and infrastructure along the Nile River becomes apparent (see also The Great Bend of Nile, Day & Night.)
Another brightly lit region is visible along the eastern coastline of the Mediterranean—the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area in Israel (image right). To the east of Tel-Aviv lies Amman, Jordan. The two major water bodies that define the western and eastern coastlines of the Sinai Peninsula—the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Aqaba—are outlined by lights along their coastlines (image lower right). The city lights of Paphos, Limassol, Larnaca, and Nicosia are visible on the island of Cyprus (image top).
Scattered blue-grey clouds cover the Mediterranean Sea and the Sinai, while much of northeastern Africa is cloud-free. A thin yellow-brown band tracing the Earth’s curvature at image top is airglow, a faint band of light emission that results from the interaction of atmospheric atoms and molecules with solar radiation at approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) altitude.
from NASA

One of the fascinating aspects of viewing Earth at night is how well the lights show the distribution of people. In this view of Egypt, we see a population almost completely concentrated along the Nile Valley, just a small percentage of the country’s land area.

The Nile River and its delta look like a brilliant, long-stemmed flower in this astronaut photograph of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea, as seen from the International Space Station. The Cairo metropolitan area forms a particularly bright base of the flower. The smaller cities and towns within the Nile Delta tend to be hard to see amidst the dense agricultural vegetation during the day. However, these settled areas and the connecting roads between them become clearly visible at night. Likewise, urbanized regions and infrastructure along the Nile River becomes apparent (see also The Great Bend of Nile, Day & Night.)

Another brightly lit region is visible along the eastern coastline of the Mediterranean—the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area in Israel (image right). To the east of Tel-Aviv lies Amman, Jordan. The two major water bodies that define the western and eastern coastlines of the Sinai Peninsula—the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Aqaba—are outlined by lights along their coastlines (image lower right). The city lights of Paphos, Limassol, Larnaca, and Nicosia are visible on the island of Cyprus (image top).

Scattered blue-grey clouds cover the Mediterranean Sea and the Sinai, while much of northeastern Africa is cloud-free. A thin yellow-brown band tracing the Earth’s curvature at image top is airglow, a faint band of light emission that results from the interaction of atmospheric atoms and molecules with solar radiation at approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) altitude.

from NASA

Tags: NASA space Earth