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Climate Change Could Happen Slower for the Next Decade, Study Says


Justin Worland 
Atmospheric temperatures are expected to rise slowly in the next decade
Temperatures have risen more slowly in the past decade than in the previous 50 years and will continue to rise at a somewhat slower rate in the next decade, according to a new study, even as climate change continues to raise temperatures to unprecedented levels worldwide.
The study, published in the journal Science, explained the temporary slowdown in rising temperatures as a potential consequence of the end of a 30-year current cycle in the Atlantic Ocean that pushes heat into the ocean.
“In the 21st century, surface warming slowed as more heat moved into deeper oceans,” the study says.
Despite this brief respite, the study says temperatures will begin to rise more quickly after the cycle is complete.
“Each of the last three decades has been successively warmer at the Earth’s surface than any preceding decade since 1850,” according to a different study published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
“Trends based on short records are very sensitive to the beginning and end dates and do not in general reflect long-term climate trends,” the IPCC study said, cautioning that the slowdown in global warming does not mean the atmosphere will not continue to heat at a faster rate.
through Time magazine

Climate Change Could Happen Slower for the Next Decade, Study Says

NASA Probes Record Sounds In Space – And It’s Terrifying.

Despite what you’ve heard, there are actual sounds in space.

Due to the virtual vacuum in space, it’s not sound like you and I experience it (that being waves pulsing through the air), but there are electromagnetic waves that pulsate at the same wavelength as the sound waves we can hear.

Instruments on several NASA probes including Voyager have recorded these waves and translated them into a sound that we can hear, and they are all kinds of spooky. This is the kind of thing you hear in a movie just before someone opens a door in a dark hallway.

So, take a listen to the true nature of the solar system. And sleep tight.

source

Good job, Sydney! The city is now offering recyclers food vouchers, city bus tickets and the chance to win harbour tickets to New Year’s Eve celebrations in exchange for plastic and metal waste:http://bit.ly/1ogExP8Image: Cash for Containers Campaign
source

Good job, Sydney! The city is now offering recyclers food vouchers, city bus tickets and the chance to win harbour tickets to New Year’s Eve celebrations in exchange for plastic and metal waste:http://bit.ly/1ogExP8

Image: Cash for Containers Campaign

source

Tags: Earth smart cool
Read More:L#1: http://is.gd/YMoeJ9L#2: http://is.gd/XrzgovEnlarge this graphic: http://is.gd/QudEJAMore science graphics here: http://is.gd/ytqOG8
from Hashem AL-ghaili

Read More:

L#1: http://is.gd/YMoeJ9
L#2: http://is.gd/Xrzgov

Enlarge this graphic: http://is.gd/QudEJA
More science graphics here: http://is.gd/ytqOG8

from Hashem AL-ghaili

178 barrels of oil spill into Colorado’s only designated wild and scenic river

A 7,500-gallon storage tank of crude oil has completely drained into the scenic Cache La Poudre, Colorado’s only designated National Wild and Scenic River, southeast of Fort Collins.

Vegetation was covered by an oil slick a quarter-mile downstream, but authorities claim “no drinking water intakes have been affected.”

The environmental disaster occurred at Noble Energy facility near Windsor in northern Colorado, in imminent proximity to the popular Poudre River Trail, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) reported late Friday afternoon.

Spring floods caved in the riverbank with a sat storage tank containing 178 barrels (roughly 7,500 gallons or over 28 tons) of crude oil. As a result the tank dropped from its foundation and broke a discharge valve, so all of the oil inside just flowed out right into the river, polluting the water and vegetation several hundred meters downstream.

A statement issued by the Colorado Department of Natural Resources maintained that no drinking water intakes have been affected by the spill, said Todd Hartman, a representative of the Colorado Department of Natural Resources.

“The release is not ongoing,” he said, adding that the well near the tank has been shut in.

A similar tank next to the damaged one remained intact.

The operator of the oil storage facility reported the incident to Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission and State Department of Public Health and Environment.

A combined response team from these organizations and Noble Energy have been deployed to the area.

The clean-up crew deployed skimming absorbent material everywhere oil could be seen and used a vacuum truck to remove oil-contaminated water from the low area around the tank.

source: RT

This is what it looks like to swim between two continental plates. The Silfra fissure in Iceland separates the North American and Eurasian plates, which drift 2 cm away from each other every year, causing earthquakes about once per decade.Read more: http://huff.to/1lsEyN4 via The Huffington PostImage: Alex Mustard
source

This is what it looks like to swim between two continental plates. The Silfra fissure in Iceland separates the North American and Eurasian plates, which drift 2 cm away from each other every year, causing earthquakes about once per decade.

Read more: http://huff.to/1lsEyN4 via The Huffington Post

Image: Alex Mustard

source

Because I’m too depressed to leave my home today, here’s some lovely planet Earth :)
Van Gogh from Space - July 13th, 2005

In the style of Van Gogh’s painting “Starry Night,” massive congregations of greenish phytoplankton swirl in the dark water around Gotland, a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea. Phytoplankton are microscopic marine plants that form the first link in nearly all ocean food chains. Population explosions, or blooms, of phytoplankton, like the one shown here, occur when deep currents bring nutrients up to sunlit surface waters, fueling the growth and reproduction of these tiny plants.

Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7
text source: NASA

Because I’m too depressed to leave my home today, here’s some lovely planet Earth :)

Van Gogh from Space - July 13th, 2005

In the style of Van Gogh’s painting “Starry Night,” massive congregations of greenish phytoplankton swirl in the dark water around Gotland, a Swedish island in the Baltic Sea. Phytoplankton are microscopic marine plants that form the first link in nearly all ocean food chains. Population explosions, or blooms, of phytoplankton, like the one shown here, occur when deep currents bring nutrients up to sunlit surface waters, fueling the growth and reproduction of these tiny plants.

Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7

text source: NASA

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu CraterHalema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fbSee more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater athttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb
photo and text from NASA

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

Halema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.

See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/

See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at 
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fb

See more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb

photo and text from NASA

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu CraterHalema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fbSee more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater athttp://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb
text and photo from NASA 

Kilauea’s Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

Halema’uma’u Crater is the center of activity at Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano. From 1820—when visiting scientists began recording their observations—until 1924, Halema’uma’u and much of Kilauea Caldera was usually filled with a lava lake. In 1924, lava drained suddenly, vaporizing groundwater deep beneath the caldera. A series of violent steam explosions followed, sculpting Halema’uma’u into its current shape. For the rest of the 20th Century, Halema’uma’u occasionally filled with lava, but quickly drained again. Most of the time the crater floor was solid. The pattern ended in March 2008, when a new pit formed along the eastern edge of Halema’uma’u; deep within the new pit crater was a lava lake. Since the pit crater formed, it has slowly expanded and is now about 160 meters (520 ft) across. The level of the lava fluctuates as magma moves from beneath the summit to the ongoing eruption in Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. This U.S. Geological Survey photograph of the lava lake was taken from the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on February 1, 2014. The level had dropped slightly from the previous day, leaving a black veneer of lava on the crater walls just above the surface of the lava and easily visible in this photograph.

See the image and read more from the U.S. Geological Survey at
https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgeologicalsurvey/12792432484/

See the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from space at 
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81781&src=fb

See more satellite imagery of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=36090&src=fb

text and photo from NASA