Wissenschaft und Deutsch

It’s the birthday of Oskar Klein, who was born in 1894 in Danderyd, Sweden. In 1921 mathematician Theodor Kaluza cast Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity into five dimensions (four space; one time). Kaluza’s extension had the advantage that four-dimensional general relativity and four-dimensional electromagnetism emerged neatly from theory. But what was the meaning of the extra dimension? In 1926 Oskar Klein proposed that the fourth spatial dimension is curled up in a circle of such tiny radius that a particle moving a short distance along the dimension’s axis would return to its origin. The extra dimension would be effectively invisible. Klein’s imaginative idea of compactifying spatial dimensions formed the basis of Kaluza–Klein theory, which unified gravity and electromagnetism, and of later theories, such as M-theory, which requires 11 dimensions.

from Physics Today

Bonobo compassion recorded in jungleRead more http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001548404
through 
Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)

Bonobo compassion recorded in jungle
Read more http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0001548404

through 


Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)

Woman of 24 found to have no cerebellum in her brain!A woman has reached the age of 24 without anyone realising she was missing a large part of her brain. The case highlights just how adaptable the organ is.The discovery was made when the woman was admitted to the Chinese PLA General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command in Shandong Province complaining of dizziness and nausea. She told doctors she’d had problems walking steadily for most of her life, and her mother reported that she hadn’t walked until she was 7 and that her speech only became intelligible at the age of 6.Doctors did a CAT scan and immediately identified the source of the problem – her entire cerebellum was missing (see scan). The space where it should be was empty of tissue. Instead it was filled with cerebrospinal fluid, which cushions the brain and provides defence against disease.The cerebellum – sometimes known as the “little brain” – is located underneath the two hemispheres. It looks different from the rest of the brain because it consists of much smaller and more compact folds of tissue. It represents about 10 per cent of the brain’s total volume but contains 50 per cent of its neurons.Read more:http://tinyurl.com/pbzvw9c
from Daily Anatomy

Woman of 24 found to have no cerebellum in her brain!

A woman has reached the age of 24 without anyone realising she was missing a large part of her brain. The case highlights just how adaptable the organ is.

The discovery was made when the woman was admitted to the Chinese PLA General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command in Shandong Province complaining of dizziness and nausea. She told doctors she’d had problems walking steadily for most of her life, and her mother reported that she hadn’t walked until she was 7 and that her speech only became intelligible at the age of 6.

Doctors did a CAT scan and immediately identified the source of the problem – her entire cerebellum was missing (see scan). The space where it should be was empty of tissue. Instead it was filled with cerebrospinal fluid, which cushions the brain and provides defence against disease.

The cerebellum – sometimes known as the “little brain” – is located underneath the two hemispheres. It looks different from the rest of the brain because it consists of much smaller and more compact folds of tissue. It represents about 10 per cent of the brain’s total volume but contains 50 per cent of its neurons.

Read more:
http://tinyurl.com/pbzvw9c

from Daily Anatomy

Violinist plays Mozart during brain surgery to conquer 20-year hand tremor (VIDEO)
A violinist played Mozart during her brain surgery in an Israeli clinic to help neurosurgeons correct her hand tremor. For 20 years the tremor halted her career, but after the operation she will be able to play professionally again.
Naomi Elishuv was a professional violinist of the Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra before diagnosed with a hand tremor. She then had to stop her career.
On Tuesday, Elishuv underwent surgery at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center to suppress the symptoms of her disease.
The operation was unique: Professor Yitzhak Fried, Director of Functional Neurosurgery, who operated on Naomi, said that this was the first time he "operated on a patient who played an instrument during surgery. I am so pleased that we had the opportunity to enjoy a private concert from a most talented and honorable musician," he told Israeli media.
Fried explained that during the operation the doctors implanted and positioned a brain pacemaker with electrodes in the area of the brain disturbance. The device emits impulses to suppress the tremor that was disturbing Elishuv’s violin-playing.
read more and watch video from RT!

Violinist plays Mozart during brain surgery to conquer 20-year hand tremor (VIDEO)

A violinist played Mozart during her brain surgery in an Israeli clinic to help neurosurgeons correct her hand tremor. For 20 years the tremor halted her career, but after the operation she will be able to play professionally again.

Naomi Elishuv was a professional violinist of the Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra before diagnosed with a hand tremor. She then had to stop her career.

On Tuesday, Elishuv underwent surgery at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center to suppress the symptoms of her disease.

The operation was unique: Professor Yitzhak Fried, Director of Functional Neurosurgery, who operated on Naomi, said that this was the first time he "operated on a patient who played an instrument during surgery. I am so pleased that we had the opportunity to enjoy a private concert from a most talented and honorable musician," he told Israeli media.

Fried explained that during the operation the doctors implanted and positioned a brain pacemaker with electrodes in the area of the brain disturbance. The device emits impulses to suppress the tremor that was disturbing Elishuv’s violin-playing.

read more and watch video from RT!

Scanning electron micrograph of stinging hairs on the surface of a nettle leaf. The large stinging hairs (trichomes) are hollow tubes with walls of silica making them into tiny glass needles. The bulb at the base of each hair contains the stinging liquid that includes formic acid, histamine, acetylcholine and 5- hydroxytryptamine (serotonin). The tips of the glassy hairs are very easily broken when brushed, leaving a sharp point, which easily pierces the skin to deliver the sting.
text and photo source

Scanning electron micrograph of stinging hairs on the surface of a nettle leaf. The large stinging hairs (trichomes) are hollow tubes with walls of silica making them into tiny glass needles. The bulb at the base of each hair contains the stinging liquid that includes formic acid, histamine, acetylcholine and 5- hydroxytryptamine (serotonin). The tips of the glassy hairs are very easily broken when brushed, leaving a sharp point, which easily pierces the skin to deliver the sting.

text and photo source

Today in “vaccinate your children or I will throw you into a fire” news:
Measles cases are the highest they’ve been since the disease was eradicated from the US in 2000. So why are parents choosing not to vaccinate? Find out the facts in NOVA's “Vaccines - Calling the Shots”, airing on PBS tonight (10 September) at 9pm ET. It's one of the best explanations we've seen of the science behind vaccines.
from ScienceAlert

Today in “vaccinate your children or I will throw you into a fire” news:

Measles cases are the highest they’ve been since the disease was eradicated from the US in 2000. So why are parents choosing not to vaccinate? Find out the facts in NOVA's “Vaccines - Calling the Shots”, airing on PBS tonight (10 September) at 9pm ET. It's one of the best explanations we've seen of the science behind vaccines.

from ScienceAlert

A visual guide to understand different types of strokeIschemic Stroke: The most common type of stroke is known as an ischemic stroke. Nearly nine out of 10 strokes fall into this category. The culprit is a blood clot that obstructs a blood vessel inside the brain. The clot may develop on the spot or travel through the blood from elsewhere in the body.Hemorrhagic Stroke: Hemorrhagic strokes are less common but far more likely to be fatal. They occur when a weakened blood vessel in the brain bursts. The result is bleeding inside the brain that can be difficult to stop.Source and more information: http://bit.ly/1wczCSm
through Daily Anatomy

A visual guide to understand different types of stroke

Ischemic Stroke: The most common type of stroke is known as an ischemic stroke. Nearly nine out of 10 strokes fall into this category. The culprit is a blood clot that obstructs a blood vessel inside the brain. The clot may develop on the spot or travel through the blood from elsewhere in the body.

Hemorrhagic Stroke: Hemorrhagic strokes are less common but far more likely to be fatal. They occur when a weakened blood vessel in the brain bursts. The result is bleeding inside the brain that can be difficult to stop.

Source and more information: http://bit.ly/1wczCSm

through Daily Anatomy

Right now, people with pacemakers need to go into surgery every time the battery dies. But this new pacemaker is based on the mechanics of a self-winding wristwatch, drawing all its power from the patient’s beating heart. Read more: http://bit.ly/1nxMm0K
from ScienceAlert

Right now, people with pacemakers need to go into surgery every time the battery dies. But this new pacemaker is based on the mechanics of a self-winding wristwatch, drawing all its power from the patient’s beating heart. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/1nxMm0K

from ScienceAlert

Meet the common spotted cuscus from Cape York in Australia and Papua New Guinea. To hide their golden coats from predators while they’re sleeping in the trees, they curl leaves around their bodies like a blanket. Aaaaand… we just died from cuteness. Read more: http://ow.ly/AAKqi via Australian Geographic
through ScienceAlert


Meet the common spotted cuscus from Cape York in Australia and Papua New Guinea. To hide their golden coats from predators while they’re sleeping in the trees, they curl leaves around their bodies like a blanket. Aaaaand… we just died from cuteness. 

Read more: http://ow.ly/AAKqi via Australian Geographic

through ScienceAlert

Japan may be short on land, but that’s not stopping the country from investing in renewable energy. Two floating solar farms are scheduled to be operational by April 2015, and they’ll eventually become part of a 60 megawatt floating solar network: http://bit.ly/1qWwSUL
source 

Japan may be short on land, but that’s not stopping the country from investing in renewable energy. Two floating solar farms are scheduled to be operational by April 2015, and they’ll eventually become part of a 60 megawatt floating solar network: http://bit.ly/1qWwSUL

source