Wissenschaft und Deutsch

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Layered MRI Self-Portraits Engraved in Glass Sheets by Angela Palmer

Tags: science art
Artist Ione Thorkelsson casts objects (including human bones) into glass:“As an object maker I am always on the look-out for things to cast and there are always lots of bones hanging around the studio. I am drawn to bones as objects. Bones are always such nice shapes, all those complex curves. They are of a nice scale that can be held in the hand. I can’t pick up a bone without speculating about the form that has generated the bone. It’s a simple structural calculation. If you have the bone, you have the whole creature. The form of the creature is implicit in the bone.”Her work is well worth a look on her website:http://bit.ly/1jmom49Source: http://bit.ly/1oF097T
text source 

Artist Ione Thorkelsson casts objects (including human bones) into glass:

“As an object maker I am always on the look-out for things to cast and there are always lots of bones hanging around the studio. I am drawn to bones as objects. Bones are always such nice shapes, all those complex curves. They are of a nice scale that can be held in the hand. I can’t pick up a bone without speculating about the form that has generated the bone. It’s a simple structural calculation. If you have the bone, you have the whole creature. The form of the creature is implicit in the bone.”

Her work is well worth a look on her website:http://bit.ly/1jmom49

Source: http://bit.ly/1oF097T

text source 

This scanning electron microscope image of a grain of sea salt [left] and a peppercorn [right] was the winner in the 2005 Visions of Science Photographic Awards. Salt (NaCl) is essential to life as it regulates the amount of water in our bodies.Image: David McCarthy and Annie Cavanagh
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This scanning electron microscope image of a grain of sea salt [left] and a peppercorn [right] was the winner in the 2005 Visions of Science Photographic Awards. Salt (NaCl) is essential to life as it regulates the amount of water in our bodies.

Image: David McCarthy and Annie Cavanagh

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8TH PLACE1983 PHOTOMICROGRAPHY COMPETITION
Du Boistesselin
Chu. La Pitie’Paris, France
Subject Matter:
Antique 19th century microscope slide featuring composition of mounted butterfly scales and diatoms (35x)
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8TH PLACE
1983 PHOTOMICROGRAPHY COMPETITION

Du Boistesselin

Chu. La Pitie’
Paris, France

Subject Matter:

Antique 19th century microscope slide featuring composition of mounted butterfly scales and diatoms (35x)

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Artist Hubert Duprat has collaborated with caddisfly larvae by placing them in an environment full of gold and jewels. The larvae then use these materials to make jewel-encrusted casings.More info: http://is.gd/rDys2ESource: Cabinet magazine via I fucking love science

Artist Hubert Duprat has collaborated with caddisfly larvae by placing them in an environment full of gold and jewels. The larvae then use these materials to make jewel-encrusted casings.

More info: http://is.gd/rDys2E
Source: Cabinet magazine via I fucking love science

Van Gogh’s Skin
Mark Hutchin, University of MichiganArt Quilt by Carole Nicholas, Fiber Artists@Loose Ends
Basal skin carcinoma is the most common form of human skin cancer and can be modeled in mice because their underlying skin structure is similar to humans. Learning about how the disease forms in mice may provide clues to prevent skin cancer in humans.
Image: (Left) A cross-section of mouse skin with basal cell carcinoma is shown. The normal skin surface is stained red using Masoson trichrome stain. The blue dye marks the fibrous layer of collagen underlying the skin surface, and the basal tumor cells appear in the red at the bottom. (Right) Using Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” as inspiration, the artist renders the image with fabric and stitching to simulate the painter’s brushwork.
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Van Gogh’s Skin

Mark Hutchin, University of Michigan
Art Quilt by Carole Nicholas, Fiber Artists@Loose Ends

Basal skin carcinoma is the most common form of human skin cancer and can be modeled in mice because their underlying skin structure is similar to humans. Learning about how the disease forms in mice may provide clues to prevent skin cancer in humans.

Image: (Left) A cross-section of mouse skin with basal cell carcinoma is shown. The normal skin surface is stained red using Masoson trichrome stain. The blue dye marks the fibrous layer of collagen underlying the skin surface, and the basal tumor cells appear in the red at the bottom. (Right) Using Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” as inspiration, the artist renders the image with fabric and stitching to simulate the painter’s brushwork.

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Nicknamed a ‘shockfossil’ this sculpture was generated by a particle accelerator, which is a device that uses electromagnetic fields to propel electrically-charged particles to extremely high speeds. It takes up to 5 million volts to accelerate a beam of electrons into acrylic, and when these temporarily trapped electrons are released, they are carefully gathered into channels that look like everything from river deltas to trees to human lungs. Read more: http://bit.ly/16NghOg
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Nicknamed a ‘shockfossil’ this sculpture was generated by a particle accelerator, which is a device that uses electromagnetic fields to propel electrically-charged particles to extremely high speeds. It takes up to 5 million volts to accelerate a beam of electrons into acrylic, and when these temporarily trapped electrons are released, they are carefully gathered into channels that look like everything from river deltas to trees to human lungs. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/16NghOg

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Look closely. This isn’t just a picture of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”; it’s a rendition of the famous painting made out of images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope.View larger image here: http://bit.ly/18JFfM6Image: Alex H Parker via Science Is Awesome 
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Look closely. This isn’t just a picture of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”; it’s a rendition of the famous painting made out of images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope.

View larger image here: http://bit.ly/18JFfM6

Image: Alex H Parker via Science Is Awesome
 

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#3. Sciencey cakes!

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